Free USA Shipping!

5 vitamins that are good for your brain

by Tina Sendin February 03, 2020

5 vitamins that are good for your brain

Let’s play a mini Hollywood quiz here.

What do the movies “Limitless” and “Lucy" have in common?

Aside from having A-listers headlining them, both movies feature the main characters ingesting certain substances that allow them to have a superhuman brain! The substances help them actively use a massive portion of their brain and achieve an out-of-this-world cognitive function.

Of course, these are pure fiction (for now at least) and it would take a Black Mirror-like dystopia for us to experience it ourselves.

But while an almost 100% brain function is still in the realm of sci-fi, achieving optimal cognitive function like attention, memory, reasoning, and learning languages is already possible.

Whether you want to learn faster, avoid Alzheimer’s disease, or simply win those memory card games (or mini quizzes like that one), you can boost focus, memory, and mental clarity... all thanks to vitamins.

For a healthier brain, here are the 5 vitamins that you should take stat!

 

Vitamin B-12

To function properly, your brain needs a good dose of Vitamin B-12, which is said to slow down or lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease, especially when taken with Omega-3 fatty acids. [1]

B-12 is highly important for retaining memory. In fact, one of the first things doctors would look into for memory loss is the patient's Vitamin B-12 level.

According to Daniel Kaufer, MD, Director of the University of North Carolina's Memory Disorders program, a normal level is found somewhere between 200 and 900 picograms per milliliter. However, if levels are at the lower end of this range, then a person needs additional supplements to achieve an optimal level. [2]

 

Vitamin B-12 is usually found in animal products. Those who need Vitamin B-12 supplements include vegans and vegetarians, those with bowel issues, as well as older people who no longer absorb it as effectively as when they're younger.

It'd be good to note though that once the body reaches an optimum level of Vitamin B-12, taking supplements won't make your memory any better. 

 

Vitamin E

As an antioxidant, Vitamin E can protect your body from harmful elements that can affect your brain cells negatively. 

Found in foods such as nuts, vegetables (spinach, bell peppers), seeds, and dark-colored fruits (blueberries, blackberries), Vitamin E can boost memory and slow down the progression of Alzheimer's.

According to a study published in 2014 at the Journal of American Medical Association, high levels of vitamin E can "help people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease." [13]

Vitamin E deficiency isn't really common but those with low levels maintain a low-fat diet.

On the flip side, be careful about overdoing your Vitamin E supplements, as taking more than 1,000 international units (IU) daily can be unsafe. [4]

 

Omega-3 fatty acid

Studies show the promise of Omega-3 fatty acids in creating optimal brain performance. In fact, some reports say that consuming fatty fish rich in omega-3 increase the gray matter in the brain, which is indicative of strong cognitive performance. [5

However, the jury's still out on this one. Some studies have found the polar opposite, saying that omega-3 consumption for 5 years will NOT necessarily lead to better brain function. [6

Either way, omega-3 has a lot of other health benefits such as healthier heart, so keep going for that fatty fish for dinner anyway!

 

Ginkgo Biloba

This supplement is popular in Europe for treating a certain type of dementia that is caused by reduced blood flow. While it doesn't necessarily prevent dementia, it may ease or stabilize symptoms of it.

However, more research needs to be done to confirm the effectivity of ginkgo biloba for boosting memory. Just like omega-3, there are conflicting studies saying that it doesn't really keep you from suffering a loss in memory, including an 8-year study done among over 3,000 elderly folks. [7]

Also a word of caution: ginkgo biloba has blood-thinning properties so avoid taking it after surgery or post-visit to the dentist.

 

Acetyl L-Carnitine (ACL)

According to WebMD: [8]

In the body, acetyl-L-carnitine is made from L-carnitine... an amino acid (a building block for proteins) that is naturally produced in the body [and] helps produce energy. Some people take acetyl-L-carnitine by mouth for a variety of mental disorders including Alzheimer's disease, age-related memory loss, depression, thinking problems related to alcoholism, thinking problems related to Lyme disease, and thinking problems related to very poor liver function (hepatic encephalopathy).

Studies have found that Acetyl L-Carnitine improves aged brain function [9] and leads to an improved long-term memory performance [10].

 

While ACL is naturally produced by the body, some supplements also contain a good amount of it.

If you're deficient in any of these vitamins, or want to make sure you're maximizing your brain health, taking a cognitive enhancement supplement can be helpful.

Check out our Neuro Force which also contains caffeine and L-Theanine, to give you smooth focused energy while helping to support blood circulation in the brain and nervous system for increased oxygen delivery to neurons and brain cells for increased memory and sharp mental cognition. 

It'll help you get things done and be your best. (You can buy it here.)

 

Sources

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10439712

[2] https://lunginstitute.com/blog/salt-therapy-and-copd/

[3https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27723955

[4https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24591823

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16629791

[6] http://drsircus.com/salt/real-salt-celtic-salt-and-himalayan-salt/

[7] http://www.naturallivingideas.com/himalayan-pink-salt-lamp-benefits/

[8] https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-7/

[9] http://www.nytimes.com/1989/07/04/science/science-watch-salt-and-sleep.html

[10http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/himalayan-crystal-salt-benefits/




Tina Sendin
Tina Sendin

Author




Also in VALI Blog

7 ways to stay active and fit during a winter lockdown
7 ways to stay active and fit during a winter lockdown

by Tina Sendin December 01, 2020

It’s wintertime. You’re stuck at home. Not (only) because you hate being in snow, you also hate the prospect of bringing COVID-19 into your home. So you’re doing the right thing and trying to stay at home as much as you can. But you want to keep staying active, albeit being indoors. How can this be possible? Here are some ways you can stay on top of your workout regimen, safe and warm in your home.

Read More

5 things you may be doing that damage your hair
5 things you may be doing that damage your hair

by Tina Sendin November 24, 2020

Us ladies just want to maintain healthy, luscious locks all the time – lockdown or not.

But sometimes, we’re doing more harm than good to our crowning glory... often, unbeknownst to us. We may think we’re looking after our hair as best as we could, but at times they turn out to be a disservice to our hair.

For starters, hair goes through wear and tear daily, in more ways than one. What you consider hair care may actually be damaging to it.

To resolve this, a good place to start is understanding how we may be causing harm to it.

And for this, we’ve got you covered. Here are some ways you may be damaging your hair, and a few tips to turn it around.

Read More

What's the definition of a nootropic?
What's the definition of a nootropic?

by Mark Miller October 29, 2020

Nootropics are also called "smart drugs" and "cognitive enhancers." The theory holds that they help you think better, remember more, and be more alert, creative, focused, and motivated.

Whether you're near the end of your life and suffering from memory loss, in your middle years and needing to stay alert during that afternoon slump, or a college student needing to enhance your memory, nootropics can help.

They can also help people with ADHD, anxiety, and confused thought processes.

Read More